Children Need Supportive Relationships

The single most common factor for children to develop resilience is at least one stable and committed relationship with a supportive parent, caregiver, or another adult. These relationships provide personalized responsiveness, scaffolding, and protection that buffer children from developmental disruption. They also build key capacities—such as the ability to plan, monitor, and regulate behavior—that enable…

Social And Emotional Health In Young Children

A child’s social and emotional skills, including the regulation of his or her emotions, capacity to solve problems and ability to interact with others have been identified as key factors in long-term academic and life success. With the support of CCR’s resources and education, parents and caregivers have the opportunity to enhance the social and emotional…

What Is Serve And Return?

Serve and return interactions shape brain architecture. When an infant or young child babbles, gestures, or cries, and an adult responds appropriately with eye contact, words, or a hug, neural connections are built and strengthened in the child’s brain that supports the development of communication and social skills. Much like a lively game of tennis, volleyball, or…

Summer Brain Builders Series

On August 14th, 6:30 – 8:30, we will be hosting the first “Summer Brain Building Series” here at CCR in Neptune. We are encouraging parents to come with their babies and older siblings for a night of information and fun! The topic of the night is “Brain Builders At Work” and we’ll share how parents…

Experiences Build Brain Architecture

Early experiences affect the development of brain architecture, which provides the foundation for all future learning, behavior, and health. Just as a weak foundation compromises the quality and strength of a house, adverse experiences early in life can impair brain architecture, with negative effects lasting into adulthood. An “environment of relationships” is crucial for the development…

Books Build Better Brains

Nurturing from a loving parent or caregiver in the early years supports healthy brain development that forms the foundation for success later at school and in life – and one of the best ways of engaging with young children is through looking at books together. Even the youngest baby loves to be held close and…

Serve And Return Interactions

Serve and return interactions shape brain architecture. When an infant or young child babbles, gestures, or cries, and an adult responds appropriately with eye contact, words, or a hug, neural connections are built and strengthened in the child’s brain that support the development of communication and social skills. Much like a lively game of tennis, volleyball, or…

Brain Architecture

Early experiences affect the development of brain architecture, which provides the foundation for all future learning, behavior, and health. Just as a weak foundation compromises the quality and strength of a house, adverse experiences early in life can impair brain architecture, with negative effects lasting into adulthood. Brains are built over time, from the bottom…

Core Principles of Development Can Help Us Redesign Policy and Practice

According to The Center On The Developing Child at Harvard, recent advances in the science of brain development offer an unprecedented opportunity to solve some of society’s most challenging problems, from widening disparities in school achievement and economic productivity to costly health problems across the lifespan. Understanding how the experiences children have starting at birth,…

Positive Parenting Tips

In their first year, babies learn to focus their vision, reach out, explore, and learn about the things that are around them. Cognitive, or brain development means the learning process of memory, language, thinking, and reasoning. Learning language is more than making sounds (“babble”), or saying “ma-ma” and “da-da”. Listening, understanding, and knowing the names…